At the IKM table: linearity, participation, accountability and individual agency on the practice-based change menu (1)

(Originally posted on KM for me… and You?)

On 20 and 21 February 2012, the  London-based Wellcome Collection is the stage for the final workshop organised by the Information Knowledge Management Emergent (IKM-Emergent or ‘IKM-E’) programme. Ten IKM-E members are looking at the body of work completed in the past five years in this DGIS-funded research programme and trying to unpack four key themes that are interweaving the work of the three working groups which have been active in the programme:

  1. Linearity and predictability;
  2. Participation and engagement;
  3. Individual agency and organisational remit;
  4. Accountability

This very rich programme is also a tentative intermediary step towards a suggested extension for the programme.

In this post I’m summarising quite a few of the points mentioned during the first day of the workshop, covering the first two points on the list above.

On linearity and predictability:

Linear approaches to development – suggesting that planning is a useful exercise to map out and follow a predictable causal series of events – are delusional and ineffective and we have other perspectives that can help plan with a higher degree of realism, if not certainty.

Linearity and predictability strongly emphasise the current (and desired alternative) planning tools that we have at our disposal or are sometimes forced to use, and the relation that we entertain with the actors promoting these specific planning tools.

Continue reading

Development and the private sector

At a recent meeting of IKM Emergent, we discussed what we mean when we’re talking about the private sector. The reason for this is that there is a general expectation that the private sector should be at the table when there are multi-stake holder processes related to development. But there seems to be a great vagueness about who and what the private sector is…

Continue reading

Lost in translation (Part 2)

The recent colloquium on Traducture & Translation: Creating intercultural dialogue in International Development held at Cumberland Lodge in Windsor, London, United Kingdom from 27 – 29 May 2011,  resembled an African gathering where elders share their wisdom and insights with curious young people around a fire place.  Here Charles Dhewa shares his second impressions of the colloquium.

Continue reading

Lost in translation (Part 1)

The recent colloquium on Traducture & Translation: Creating intercultural dialogue in International Development held at Cumberland Lodge in Windsor, London, United Kingdom from 27 – 29 May 2011,  resembled an African gathering where elders share their wisdom and insights with curious young people around a fire place.  Here Charles Dhewa shares his first impressions of the colloquium.

Continue reading

IKM Emergent at the EADI General Conference

The 2011 General Conference of the European Association of Development Research and Training Institutes (EADI) will be held jointly with the UK Development Studies Association (DSA) at York University, UK, from 19th to 22nd September under the title Rethinking Development in an Age of Scarcity and Uncertainty: New values, voices and alliances for increased resilience.  Working with other networks and organisations, IKM Emergent is involved in a number of the knowledge-related elements in the conference programme. Continue reading

Linked data experiment

Linked data – the machine readable web, as the inventor of the Web Tim Berners Lee explains here is the next layer of the web. He developed a five star rating to describe information which is fully compliant with the semantic web and allows it to become part of the growing web of linked data. In the recent discussion paper IKMemergent explained why this was relevant for the international development community.

As a result of participation in the IKMemergent Workshop in Oxford, UK, in November 2010, IFPRI has taken the Global Hunger Index (GHI) as an example and published it as a linked data RDF files and documented the experience. We worked with Practical participation to develop the initial files and seek guidance on the options and approaches for publishing linked data. This is the first stage of the project to make the data available and then monitor its use and look at ways to promote and integrate it with more datasets.

Groups have already used the original data of the GHI to produce new mappings of the data, see the examples from Tableau and Chartsbin. By publishing the linked data we hope others will integrate the information with other visualizations and disseminate the results of the report.

Linked data has already been used by the international community to bring together different datasets, for example comparing Aid from the UK and USA.

The process of initially setting up a process to publish linked data sets is involved, but obviously with a recurring dataset such as the Global hunger Index it is easy to update.

Although the datasets prove challenging to convert, information on many of the organisations outputs is already available in Linked data form. The hundred or so wikipedia pages featuring links and descriptions of IFPRI output are already part of the web of linked data through Dbpedia. A sample of metadata describing IFPRI presentations, collections and twitter accounts can be seen through Sindice.

Get the data

At present the GHI 2010 data is made available in two different forms and is available in raw RDF/XML and N3 files. http://data.ifpri.org/rdf/ghi/

Chris

|Chris Addison|Head of Web Communication IFPRI

Development knowledge ecology: another visit to the KM kitchen?

We’ve been talking recently with colleagues about the development knowledge ecology – with an implicit understanding that we all know what it means – but we’ve never really tried to define it so I’m going to have a go here.  Or in any event to outline some key influences, key ingredients. In fact, given that we are in the process of developing it as one of IKM’s core arguments, it’s probably time to get cooking…. Continue reading

Follow

Get every new post delivered to your Inbox.